Author Archives: GoLive Indonesia

About GoLive Indonesia

Think. Discuss. Tweet. Blog.

Indonesia Research Update #11: Traditional Games as Learning Media of Mathematics by Eka Puspita Sari

Screen Shot 2017-11-30 at 9.28.19 am

Computer games are one of powerful mathematics learning tools that can enhance students’ motivation and has a vast majority of learning materials.

There are many research papers that study the utilization of modern computer games to support learning. However, none of those games are related to traditional games.

Indonesian folk games are prone to be forgotten due to the limitedness of resources about Indonesian folk games.

Addressing this issue, Eka Puspita Sari’s research will investigate the development of mathematics learning media, based on the folk games of Indonesia for Elementary school level.

Her study aims to provide a learning media whose function enhances motivational and learning outcomes, adds educational literature that suits the latest Indonesian curriculum and introduces one of Indonesia’s cultural aspect to students.

Her study will be implemented in one of Elementary School in Batam city. The participants of this study are students from grade one to six.

The study uses research and development method. The study has started by analysing mathematics learning media of an elementary school in Indonesia and developing a new learning media, based on the traditional games of Indonesia.

Therefore, the computer learning media as the product of this research will be used as a supplement material in teaching mathematics in Indonesia following expert analysis and students trial.

Further information could be accessed by contacting Eka in A1722607@student.adelaide.edu.au

 

Eka Puspita Sari is a postgraduate student in Master of Education program, the University of Adelaide, with support of scholarship from Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP).

 

Indonesia Research Update is an initiative by GoLive Indonesia that aims to promote and disseminate knowledge and information obtained through research completed by Indonesian students outside of Indonesia.

We sincerely thank Eka and wish the best for her future endeavours in career and life.

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under Education, IndonesiaResearchUpdate

Indonesia Research Update #10: Cultural Representation in an English Textbook by Soni Ariawan

20160727_161142

A nation’s cultural representation in an English textbook is vital to help student understand the learning content contextually.

Motivated to improve knowledge on this issue, Soni Ariawan, founder of Gelora Education Centre in Lombok, Indonesia whom also a Master of Education student in The University of Adelaide, conducted a research specifically in Indonesia context.

His study investigates cultural representation in an English textbook prescribed for senior high school in Indonesia which is officially published by Ministry of Education and Culture in 2017.

The research aims to explore cultural dimensions and cultural categories revealed in the textbook by employing Byram’s checklist of cultural dimensions and Cortazzi and Jin’s categories of culture as the theoretical frameworks.

The data for analysis is selected from the textbook which includes conversations, reading texts and visual elements. The findings show that stereotypes and national identity dominate the cultural dimensions with 28.05% of the total dimensions.

The indications are disseminated in various forms including artefacts, popular people and popular places. The inclusion of national identity is pivotal for learners since the textbook is prescribed for senior high school students who are tremendously curious to determine their own characters.

Hence, presenting popular people who have many achievements or have made many contributions might be useful for them and may give them good role models. This idea is also aligned with the main aim of 2013 curriculum to facilitate the development of students with good character, good behaviour and strong nationality.

Regarding cultural categories, source culture or Indonesian culture is the most prominent with 61.2%, while target culture and international target culture achieve 19.8% and 14.9% respectively.

The presence of source culture encompasses social interaction, school and family environment, national identity and national history as well as national geography. Where the target culture is concerned, the United States of America is the most highly represented inner circle country’s culture in the textbook, while India and Japan are the countries primarily represented in the international target culture category.

It is concluded that English textbook in Indonesia is on the way to its perfection in terms of proportionally represented cultural aspects. However, the presence of various cultural aspects of source culture, target culture and international target culture is also important to help students develop multicultural awareness and a certain level of respects as well as tolerance for others.

More information could be accessed by contacting Soni in ariawansoni@gmail.com

 

Soni Ariawan is a postgraduate student in Master of Education program, the University of Adelaide, with support of scholarship from Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP)

He is the founder of Gelora Education Centre which is a language and education center to develop children quality in reading, language skill and reading to be the better generation.

 

Indonesia Research Update is an initiative by GoLive Indonesia that aims to promote and disseminate knowledge and information obtained through research completed by Indonesian students outside of Indonesia.

We sincerely thank Soni and wish the best for his future endeavours in career and life.

Leave a comment

Filed under Education, IndonesiaResearchUpdate

Indonesia Research Update #9: What do Education Policy Makers Believe and Act Regarding Parental Engagement? by Wahyuddin, S.Pd., M.Ed.

2017-10-30-PHOTO-00000033

It is undeniable that family-school collaboration results in a positive impact on students’ attitudes, achievement, emotions and health.

However, many schools do not take this advantage as there is no policy or program specified to engage parents in their children’s education. This situation can happen because of different characters showed by policy makers.

The absence of parental programs can be caused that policy makers have no positive beliefs regarding parental engagement in education.

In another condition, education policy makers may have an appropriate perspective by seeing parents as partners to reach educational goals, but they do not implement it in a real policy.

The illustration above encouraged Wahyuddin to find out whether the education policy makers at the district level possess positive beliefs and behaviours regarding parental involvement in education. Therefore, it could be known if policy makers’ beliefs are consistent with their efforts on the issue.

This study was conducted in a district in Eastern of Indonesia, funded by Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education and supervised by Dr Robert Matthews.

It employed a qualitative research using a phenomenological approach. Five education policy makers mentioned above were participating in the study through a semi-structured interview.

The research concluded that the education decision makers in the district from the regent to the principal were aware of and had an appropriate perception about the importance of parental involvement for pupils, families, schools and local governments.

However, such positive beliefs are not coherent with their actions in which they did not make policies or programs intended to involve parents.

 

More information could be accessed by contacting Wahyuddin in wahyuddinmy@gmail.com

 

Wahyuddin received Master of Education at School of Education, the University of Adelaide in 2017 and obtained his Bachelor of Education at Universitas Negeri Makassar in 2011.

He was the chairman of Student Research Institute PENALARAN and the General Secretary of Association of Indonesia Student Research Organisations (ILP2MI) from 2010 to 2011.

His research interests include teacher quality and learning, educational policy and higher education.

 

Indonesia Research Update is an initiative by GoLive Indonesia that aims to promote and disseminate knowledge and information obtained through research completed by Indonesian students outside of Indonesia.

We sincerely thank Wahyuddin and wish the best for his future endeavours in career and life.

1 Comment

Filed under IndonesiaResearchUpdate

Indonesia Research Update #8: Women’s Utterances Style by Ukhfi Thursina

IMG_1063

Ukhfi Thursina

It is inevitable that men and women have distinct ways of going about being amiable when they speak and one of the factors that make the differences between men and women’s utterances is boosters.

 

Boosting devices used to strengthen and reinforce the utterances to make the hearer do understand about the speaker’s expectation.

Epistemic modal tag, challenging tag, facilitative tag, softening tag, “you know”, “really”, “of course”, interjection and repetition are examples of such boosters.

 

It is essential however, to employ politeness strategies in emphasizing utterances as it is essential to communicate not only in effectively but also in properly way.

Using precise politeness strategies to boost the expression will be the extra spark that draws the hearer’s attention.

 

To have such a good way in speaking, the speaker should consider a bald on record, positive politeness, negative politeness, off record and do not do the face threatening act (FTA) strategy.

 

Women have been found to use boosters a lot, notably in an oral communication.

 

Ukhfi Thursina, a master degree student in School of Education, The University of Adelaide, completed a research investigating women’s extensive use of boosters as politeness strategies.

Her research used a descriptive qualitative approach by analyzing, categorizing and summarizing the content of the conversations of the women on The Hollywood Reporter Roundtable Talkshow.

 

The result of her research shows that women tend to use “you know”, tag question and “of course” to modify the force of statement.

 

Results also indicates that there are two types of commonly used politeness strategies used in those boosters: positive politeness and off record.

 

The use of positive politeness strategy seeks to point and highlight the solidarity to save the hearer’s face as it builds good relationship to both the speaker and the hearer.

More information could be accessed by contacting Ukhfi in ukhfithursina@gmail.com

 

 

Ukhfi Thursina is a postgraduate student in Master of Education Program, The University of Adelaide, with support of scholarship from Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP)

 

She has presented this study at the 2018 International Symposium on Education and Psychology in Kyoto, Japan.

 

 

Indonesia Research Update is an initiative by GoLive Indonesia that aims to promote and disseminate knowledge and information obtained through research completed by Indonesian students outside of Indonesia.

We sincerely thank Ukhfi and wish the best for her future endeavours in career and life.

Leave a comment

Filed under IndonesiaResearchUpdate

Indonesia Research Update #7: Information and Communication Technologies by Ferdinand Wadu He and team

21762101_2121066401253015_2331653042232052086_n

Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) is especially useful in developing tertiary students’ higher order thinking skills.

 

However, past literature highlighted two fundamental problems in relation to examining the utility and impact of ICT:

 

First, the difficulty in distinguishing which aspect of technology mediates learning due to the diverse forms of educational technology under the umbrella term ICT;

 

And second, the conventional conceptions of ICT as tools for drill-and-skill education rather than higher order thinking skill learning.

 

Ferdinand Wadu He, a master degree student in School of Education, The University of Adelaide, together with his fellow researchers in South Australia conducted a systematic review aiming to identify ICT utilised in tertiary education of its conceptual and methodological perspectives, and its impact on students’ higher order thinking skills.

 

The team, consisted of Hnin Nwe Nwe Tun, Cherry Htun, Che Yee Lye, Ala’ Fahed Aburumman, and Ferdinand himself searched databases such as ERIC, INSPEC, AEI and Google Scholar.

 

Total number of 114 studies meeting all three criteria concerning ICT, higher order thinking skills and tertiary educational level were included.

 

Analysis done by the team revealed that the majority of the studies emphasized on the utilisation of ICT for teaching and learning (77%), while the remaining focussed on assessment and evaluation (10%), facilities and resources (8%), curriculum and policy (1%), and others (4%).

 

The in-depth review of the 114 studies revealed that ICT tools such as Wiki, Web-based bulletin board and online discussion tools positively impacted on higher order thinking, critical thinking, problem solving and creativity skills.

 

This review from Ferdinand and his colleagues provides the implications of students need to be made aware of higher order thinking skills and the use of ICT, while teachers need to undergo professional development for use of ICT to promote students’ higher order thinking skills.

 

More information could be accessed by contacting Ferdinand in ferdinandwaduhe@gmail.com or Che Yee Lye in cheyee.lye@adelaide.edu.au

 

 

Ferdinand Wadu He is a postgraduate student in Master of Education Program, The University of Adelaide, with support of scholarship from Australia Awards Scholarship.

Ferdinand is also an active GoLive Indonesia volunteer.

 

He and his team presented this study at Higher Education Research Group of Adelaide (HERGA) 2017 Conference in Adelaide.

 

Indonesia Research Update is an initiative by GoLive Indonesia that aims to promote and disseminate knowledge and information obtained through research completed by Indonesian students outside of Indonesia.

We sincerely thank Ferdinand and his colleagues and wish the best for his future endeavours in career and life.

Leave a comment

Filed under IndonesiaResearchUpdate

Indonesia Research Update #6: Problem Based Learning by Shinta Sari

22095973_1863617456987023_3741556262185590169_o

Mathematical problem-solving abilities are critical to be learned by students for uses in their daily life activities.

 

The abilities of Indonesian students in mathematical problem solving are still leaving room for improvement.

 

Problem Based Learning (PBL) is expected being an appropriate approach to overcome the issue.

 

Shinta Sari, a master degree student in School of Education, The University of Adelaide, conducted a research comparing PBL and the more conventional approach in relation to mathematical problem-solving abilities of junior high school students in Indonesia.

 

In her research, she used quasi-experiment research with pre-test and post-test as the design, and used tests of mathematical problem-solving abilities as the instrument.

 

The result of this study revealed that the increase in mathematical problem-solving abilities of the students who were taught with PBL approach is higher than the more conventional approach.

 

She suggested utilization of PBL approach to improve students’ mathematical problem-solving abilities.

 

More information could be accessed by contacting Shinta in shintasari013@gmail.com

 

 

Shinta Sari is a postgraduate student in Master of Education Program, The University of Adelaide, with support of scholarship from LPDP (Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education).

 

She has presented this study at the 2018 International Symposium on Education and Psychology in Kyoto, Japan.

 

Indonesia Research Update is an initiative by GoLive Indonesia that aims to promote and disseminate knowledge and information obtained through research completed by Indonesian students outside of Indonesia.

We sincerely thank Shinta and wish the best for her future endeavours in career and life.

Leave a comment

Filed under IndonesiaResearchUpdate

Discussion Series Highlights: “Intellectual Property Rights: The Design and Acquiring Process of a Patent Awarded Research in Indonesia”

GoLive Indonesia collaborated with PPIA The University of Adelaide and LPDP (Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education) South Australia community in September discussion series on 26 September 2017. The discussion series highlighted on patent awarded research in Indonesia and was held in Rumours Café, The University of Adelaide. The discussion went for 90 minutes followed by welcoming event for new students hosted by LPDP South Australia community.

 

The session begins with warm greetings from GoLive Indonesia Coordinator, Indra Kiling and also by President of PPIA The University of Adelaide, Muhamad Bai’ul Hak.

IMG_3986

Greetings from GoLive Indonesia Coordinator

Edy Purwanto, today’s speaker is a current PhD student in The University of Adelaide, with expertise in chemical engineering field. He is currently granted a patent from Indonesian Government for synthesis of biodiesel through simultaneous reactions ozonolysis and transesterification. The discussion was moderated by Anne Romea, a new student in The University of Adelaide whom also a GoLive Indonesia volunteer.

 

He began the presentation with explaining definition of patent and invention, highlighting the differences on both concepts. He continued with elaborating the differences between patent and simple patent, breaking down characteristic of both, and also encouraging the attendees that a person doesn’t have to study science or have higher degrees of research to create a new invention.

IMG_3991

Edy Purwanto explaining his experience on patent registration

For examples of simple patent, he provided pictures of paper clip, ring-pull cans, aircraft seat buckle, and post-it notes. He mentioned that invention products are not necessarily sophisticated, and most of the times they are just simple things we encountered in our daily life.

 

He continued with explication on the process of designing research that could produce new invention that’s patentable, before sharing his research and the journey of obtaining his patent.

IMG_3995

Attendees paying attention

His presentation concluded after 45 minutes long and continued with question and answer session. As many as 15 persons were immersed in the discussion involving questions concerning the property rights of batik, tempeh, cost of applying a patent, royalties associated with patent, and administration procedures concerning patent.

 

The session then concluded with handing of certificate by Khusaini, lurah (head) of LPDP South Australia community to Edy, and a photo session.

IMG_3992

Certificate of appreciation

IMG_3993

Photo session

The morning then continues with a welcoming event for new students hosted by LPDP South Australia community. Leaders from several communities in South Australia gave welcoming speech such as Khusaini, Iwan Tirta as lurah of Spirit scholarship community, Michael Patrick as President of Australia Indonesia Youth Association-South Australia chapter, Soni Ariawan as secretary of MIIAS (Indonesian Islamic Society of South Australia), Bara Asyrof as representative of Rebana community, and Mada as head of Pri Muhammadiyah Adelaide.

IMG_3987

Welcoming speech and sharing from leaders of communities

 

The long morning then ended with lunch prepared and brought by all the attendees.

GoLive Indonesia would like to thank Edy Purwanto as the speaker and Anne Romea as moderator and highly appreciates the collaboration opportunity provided by PPIA The University of Adelaide and LPDP South Australia community in this event.

Further information on the presentation could be obtained by contacting Edy Purwanto in edy.purwanto@adelaide.edu.au

Photos courtesy of Ainun Najib Alfatih

 

Leave a comment

Filed under Discussion Series