Category Archives: Income inequality

Indonesia-Australia: Challenges and Opportunities (Part II)

Untitled

Christopher Findlay and David Parsons

This article is summarised from a speech presented by Professor Christopher Findlay, Executive Dean of Faculty of Professions the University of Adelaide at  AIBC SA Business Luncheon -Celebrating the anniversary of Indonesian Independence at Intercontinental Hotel Adelaide on 23 August 2012 derived from his paper co-authored with David Parsons.

This article extends discussions presented in Part I. Whilst Part I focuses on  Indonesia’s position as the world’s third largest democracy that is becoming bigger and richer, Part II explores how Australia and Indonesia, who face some similar concerns as well as some interconnected challenges, should further explore that there is much to be gained by understanding those better and then working out a better long term strategy.

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Filed under Australia, Conference, Democracy, East Asia, Economic development, Economic Integration, Food and agriculture, Income inequality, Indonesia, Infrastructure, Investment

Indonesia-Australia: Challenges and Opportunities (Part I)

Untitled

Christopher Findlay and David Parsons

This article is summarised from a speech presented by Professor Christopher Findlay, Executive Dean of Faculty of Professions the University of Adelaide at  AIBC SA Business Luncheon -Celebrating the anniversary of Indonesian Independence at Intercontinental Hotel Adelaide on 23 August 2012 derived from his paper co-authored with David Parsons.

This article focuses on two points. First, Indonesia, the world’s third largest democracy, is becoming bigger and richer, which is an important for Australia.  Second, but Australia and Indonesia face some similar concerns as well as some interconnected challenges and there is much to be gained by understanding those better and then working out a better long term strategy.

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Filed under Australia, Conference, Democracy, East Asia, Economic development, Economic Integration, Education, Food and agriculture, Income inequality, Indonesia, Infrastructure, Investment, Trade

If it’s not the economy, then what to do?

water pollution

Budi Akmal Djafar’s opinion piece in The Jakarta Post (Sept. 20) entitled “It’s [not] the economy stupid!” intrigued me. I like and support his overall idea that we should not only focus on the size of the pie (or box using his illustration) but also how to share the pie.

But being a mother of a five-year-old boy (and a baby) who is expanding his vocabulary at a pace much faster than the Chinese economy’s growth rate, the word “stupid” is a big no-no in our household.

Sure, as an economist, I know where the term originated from but mentioning that term has a big implication on how we should perceive the existing problems that Indonesia is facing now, as suggested by Budi’s piece.

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Filed under Climate change and environment, Income inequality, Indonesia, Poverty, Review of article

World Islamic Economic Forum (WIEF): Building Bridges through Business

“The 21st Century will be driven by openness, technology, connectivity, dialogue, and integration. It will be the age of possibility and opportunity. That is why the WIEF is relevant because it helps the Ummah adapt to that wondrous world. The Ummah can shape and have full ownership of the 21st Century”
– HE Dr. Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono, President of Indonesia, Honourary Member,  WIEF Foundation

The inaugural World Islamic Economic Forum (WIEF) was held in Kuala Lumpur from 1st – 3rd October 2005 with the theme ‘Forging New Alliances for Development and Progress’.  An important early decision by WIEF was that the Annual Forum would include not only Organization of the Islamic Conference (OIC) member countries and Muslim communities outside of OIC but also non-Muslim business communities across the globe.

From its inception the aim of WIEF, often now referred to as the ‘Davos of the Islamic World’, has been to build bridges between businesses – and between business and government – both within the Ummah and, increasingly, with non Muslims. WIEF believes that these ‘bridges’ will encourage investment and skills transfer which will in turn increase economic opportunities and reduce income disparities among the World’s ~1.8Bn Muslims – who collectively earn 80% less than world average income.

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Filed under Conference, Culture, Education, Income inequality, Investment, Islam, Poverty, WEF

Sharia Economics: A solution to current crisis?

A growing trend of dissatisfaction with conventional economics has raised interests in finding an alternative paradigm leading to the revival of Islamic economics over the last few decades. On 8 August 2012, Dr Izzuddin Edi Siswanto explained how Islamic economics may provide solutions to existing problems in the financial markets as well as its contribution and potentials to address development challenges.

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Filed under Economic development, Financial market, Income inequality, Indonesia, Islam, PPIA academic discussion

Rethinking Poverty

Rural poverty in Indonesia

Back in 2006, an article at the Economist reported “The Indonesian economy is growing. But so, unfortunately, is poverty“.

How about our poverty reduction programs’ progress in 2011?

On 7 December 2011 at PPIA (Indonesian student association) academic workshop, Chandra Wibowo, a graduate of Master in Applied Economics (Public Policy) who was the former president of PPIA University of Adelaide in the 2010-2011 period, presented his work “A Rethinking of Indonesia’s Poverty Reduction Strategies”. The workshop was well-attended by Indonesian students and researchers currently residing in Adelaide, South Australia.

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Filed under Economic development, Income inequality, Indonesia, Poverty, PPIA academic discussion, Review of article

Fair Trade versus Free Trade: Their Likely Consequences

fair trade certified

On 11 August 2011, the GoLive Indonesia  project ran its fourth academic discussion. Uwe Kaufmann, a PhD candidate of School of Economics, presented “The (unexpected) consequence of Fair Trade in the Pacific’s perspective”.

Before he started his presentation, Uwe Kaufmann asked the participant whether they were familiar with the idea of fair trade, had experience of buying fair trade products, and agreed with the University of Adelaide’s interest in becoming a fair-trade university in Australia. Most of participants expressed their agreement to the idea of fair trade.

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Filed under Economic development, Economic Integration, Fair trade, Food and agriculture, Income inequality, Indonesia, PPIA academic discussion, Trade