Category Archives: Research

Ben Moseley talks about Maluku

Similar to previous years, GoLive Indonesia will be showing videos of recent research done on Indonesia leading to  our 4th Indonesia Research Day, 7 April 2017.

We proudly introduce Benjamin Moseley, PhD Candidate at the Department of History of University of Hawai’i at Mānoa and student affiliate at the East-West Center in Honolulu, USA talks about his Indonesian journey and his research on Maluku, Eastern Indonesia.”

See the video via our YouTube channel below:

GoLive Indonesia would like to thanks Ben for his time and other parties supporting the production of this video. 

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Daniel Pham talks about Meditation – Indonesian Ancient Architecture

Similar to previous years, GoLive Indonesia will be showing videos of recent research done on Indonesia leading to  our 4th Indonesia Research Day, 7 April 2017.

We proudly introduce Daniel Pham, a Ph.D student at the Department of History University of Hawai’i at Mānoa, USA. Dan shares his Ph.D research on meditation as part of Indonesian Ancient Architecture and his project to built a digital archive of temples in Indonesia. See the video via our YouTube channel below:

GoLive Indonesia would like to thanks Dan for his time and other parties supporting the production of this video. 

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Filed under architecture, Indonesia, Research, Uncategorized, Video

Anis Hamidati talks about maintaining familial communication for International Students

Similar to previous years, GoLive Indonesia will be showing videos of recent research done on Indonesia leading to  our 4th Indonesia Research Day, 7 April 2017.

We proudly introduce Anis Hamidati, an Indonesian scholar and The Indonesian Ministry of Education Directorate General of Higher Education (DIKTI)  scholarship recipient currently studying at the East-West Center, University of Hawai’i at Mānoa, Honolulu, USA. Anis shares her Ph.D research on how International students maintain familial communications with the use of technology. See the video via our YouTube channel below:

 

GoLive Indonesia would like to thanks Anis for her time and other parties supporting the production of this video. 

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Filed under communication, Research, Uncategorized, Video

GoLive Indonesia Discussion Series Highlights: “Scholarship in Australia and Facilitating Alumni Collaboration and Contributions” – 10 March 2017

GoLive Indonesia is back with their first discussion series on March 10, 2017. The first discussion series of 2017 talks about “Scholarship in Australia and future alumni collaboration”. The discussion series was held at 715 Conference room, Ingkarni Wardli Building, North Terrace Campus,  The University of Adelaide.

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Discussion Series attendees

The discussion goes for 3 hours and separated into 3 sessions, the 3-possible way to get a scholarship in Australia, how to submit an application to an Australian university, and possible alumni collaborations and contributions. The discussion series is followed by a lunch networking session hosted by the School of Psychology, Faculty of Sciences, The University of Adelaide.

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Session 1 Panelists (Left to Right): Kristin Ramlan, Ari Arifin Danuwijaya, Indra Yohanes Kiling and Yanuar Syapaat

The session begins with warm greetings from GoLive Indonesia coordinator, Gracia Girsang.  Followed with elaboration on LPDP scholarship from Yanuar Syapaat and Indra Kiling. Both speakers share some tips and tricks on how to get LPDP scholarship; where some of the important points are the return agreement requirements, age limit, and to provide and prepare thoroughly particularly when the course you desire is not on the scholarship provider’s priority. Indra Kiling deliberately gave himself a bit of pressure by delaying his LPDP application to stimulate productivity.

Then,  the explanation on AAS (Australian Awards) scholarship, were presented by Kristin Ramlan and Ari Arifin. Both speakers emphasize that future applicants need to choose the most suitable awards option for themselves  – either short or long-term awards -, check discussion forum for first-hand experiences and make sure their IELTS score is sufficient, and carefully prepare for the interview. This session is closed with Aryani Tri Wrastari’s descriptions on Endeavour Scholarship.   Aryani explains 9 crucial tips in completing your Endeavour application. She emphasizes that it’s not about your major or your age is within the limit, it is more towards you showing your achievement and experiences that particularly highlights your networks, partnerships, and collaborations.

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Aryani Tri Wrastari – GoLive Enthusiast and Endeavour Awards Awardee

The second session begins straight after the other one, highlighting information on how to apply to an Australian university. This session were led by Indra Kiling and Gracia Girsang. This session encourages future students to gather information and research from available university websites and publication in relation to finding the right supervisor for their research topic. By doing so, students will be able to capture the supervisor’s interest towards their research topic and gain their support. Gracia then continues the session by providing an example of how to construct a research proposal. She highlights that in writing the research proposal, future research candidates need to be concise and flexible. A well-written proposal with around 1000-1500 words would be sufficient to get the attention of potential supervisors.

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Margaretha, Australia Awards Indonesia Short course participant, sharing about future alumni contributions

After a short break, the last session wraps up the discussion series by encouraging current and future students to contribution and to give back to their country. Margaretha, one of the panelists in Session three, reiterated that by utilising the beauty of networking, we can join a community and get involved and work towards giving back to Indonesia.  One of the attendees, Enceria Damanik, underlines how educated Indonesian students and graduates studying abroad are greatly appreciated and that Indonesia is very much looking forward to their return.

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Enceria Damanik – Australia Awards Indonesia Short course participant

Some of the Indonesian participants currently studying at the School of Education under the Australia Awards Indonesia Short Course program then join the School of Psychology for a lunch networking event. They were greeted by Professor Anna Chur-Hansen, Head of School of Psychology, Professor Deborah Turnbull, and Professor Nick Burns, also from the School of Psychology. Introduction to the School of Psychology and its research focus area were provided by Prof. Anna Chur-Hansen.

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From left to right: Prof. Nick Burns, Prof. Deborah Turnbull and Prof. Ann Chur-Hansen from the School of Psychology, The University of Adelaide

Continued with an opportunity for some of the students to share their research interest and possibility of pursuing a research degree at the school. This session is filled with enthusiasm and dynamic discussion about the students’ research topics and how to pursue it. The lunch session concluded with a group photo and excited potential higher degree research students.

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Australia Awards Indonesia Short course participants group photo

GoLive Indonesia would like to thank all the speakers and highly appreciates the support given by the School of Education and the School of Psychology, the University of Adelaide for this event. Also Swisin Budiman, GoLive Indonesia enthusiast for the highlights. We would like to wish every participant the best for their scholarships application and looking forward to their contribution to the development of Indonesia.

The discussion series presentation can be downloaded via this link GoLive Discussion Series_10March2017_PresentationCompilation 

Photos courtesy of Vidi Valianto.

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Filed under Australia Awards, Collaboration, Discussion Series, Education, Research, Scholarship, Uncategorized

Call for Volunteers: 4th Indonesia Research Day – 7 April 2017

Mark you calendar, We’ve set a date for our 4th Indonesia Research Day – 7 April 2017. Make sure you take part in our biggest annual event. We look forward to working with you.

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Call for Abstracts: 4th Indonesia Research Day – April 2017

Happy New Year 2017 ! GoLive Indonesia kindly wishes you a great year ahead.

We are happy to announce that the 4th Indonesia Research Day will be held earlier this time around.

Call for Abstracts is now open! You have until 3 February 2017 to submit your abstracts.

We received so many interests and abstracts last year, make sure you submit yours early. Detailed information on how to submit your abstracts are provided below.

Looking forward to finding out what’s new about Indonesia through your research.

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On Indonesian Disability Law: picking up the pace

In accordance with the Disability Day, 3 December 2016, our GoLive enthusiast Indra Kiling and Gracia Girsang write about progress and challenges of the Indonesian Disability Law after its enactment earlier this year. 

Six months past the enactment of Law No.8/2016 on Persons with Disabilities, Indonesia is still trying to keep up. Can Indonesia celebrate the next month’s Disability day on 3 December by presenting actual progress and implementation of the Law? Or this effort, once regarded as a significant movement, still falls short of creating an ideal environment for persons with disabilities.

Derivative regulations, socialization activities and establishing the National Disabilities Commission are key activities to implement the law up until now. However, these initiatives are considered sluggish in producing progress and the recent 800 billion rupiahs cut in Ministry of Social Services’ budget further restrain follow-up efforts.

This state of affairs is an indication that there is a crisis in the government’s commitment and understanding to disability issue, precipitating the delay in completing and implementing the law. It is hardly a new problem, considering the enforcement of another second priority law like Mental Health Law No.18/2014 is still unsatisfactory hitherto, with only one derivative regulation completed until October 2016.

Also read: Questioning our dignity in mental health

As a means to put the Disability Law into effect, both central and local government has a lot of tasks to be done swiftly in multiple sectors. According to recent doctoral research done by Indra Kiling (2016) regarding programs for persons with disabilities in Indonesia, there are at least three feasible approaches that can expedite the implementation of Disability Law.

First, as underlined by many stakeholders before, accurate data on persons with disabilities are desperately needed. Programs could not be formulated and applied effectively in the absence of a good set of data. In this matter, apart from collecting data in village level, early screening for young children is essential. Early screening not only serves as an intervention that helps to anticipate severe or multiple disabilities, it also supplies data to further improve services for persons with disabilities.

Yet, the use of early screening in community level is still somewhat lacking in Indonesia. Indra’s research found that even though health workers are equipped with the developmental screening checklist, it is often useless since the health workers don’t really grasp on the subject of disability and inclusive service.

Solving the problem with the old fashioned way, training provision for active health workers is simply not enough for the long-term scope. Universities with health courses should insert disability and inclusive health services topic in their courses’ curriculum. This move will complement article 44 in the disability law that regulates similar approach in education courses. Conceivably, the knowledge gained in higher education could help health workers in conducting disability-friendly health services, including early detection.

Second, among people with disabilities, persons with mental disability are the most discriminated and disadvantaged group. The fact that most of them could not advocate for themselves, unlike persons with physical disability, is worsening the phenomenon. Conditions like bipolar disorder, anxiety disorder and depression can actually be prevented and treated with adequate mental health services before it becomes a disabling illness. Alas, mental health services in Indonesia, like other developing countries is under performed.

According to Basic Health Survey in 2013, only 11.9 percent persons with emotional mental disorder received recent treatment, while 38.2 per cent persons with the severe mental disorder have not received any treatment. This lack of performance can be easily solved with making the most out of existing resources.

Indonesia actually has a growing mental health workforce that could be employed to empower mental health services. Jakarta has provided an exemplary service with “Healthy Jakarta” program that involves psychologists to provide services in the community health centres. The benefit of this program is that it does not depend solely on the rare and expensive services from psychiatrists, instead, it utilises the underused but ever growing psychologists’ services. This could also simultaneously reduce the rate of mental disabilities, suicides, drug abuses, and domestic violence. We believe that best practice should not only be found in the capital but also proliferated to other provinces as well.

Last but not least, as a pillar of the contemporary disability movement, inclusive education often clashes with special education. A study from Stephen Meyers, a professor at the University of Washington found that in Nicaragua, posits that an established special school often competes with new inclusive schools for students. Parents there felt that their children benefitted more in the special school. In the end that special school was forced to cease their activities by local government backed up by an international non-government organisation (NGO) that supported inclusive education.

This conflict has the potential to occur also in Indonesia, a nation that is trying to improve the inclusive education system and a home of many disability-focused international NGOs who supported inclusive education. Education service providers must always prioritise the right of persons with disabilities to choose which school is best for them. The government, like regulated in Disability Law, must provide both inclusive education and special education services, and support them without playing favourites to any side. Moreover, future derivative regulations should ensure equal implementation of both education systems throughout the nation.

The International Day of persons with disabilities – 3 December – should be used as a reminder and a boost to gain (another) momentum to reinforce the Disability Law in Indonesia. We should not wait for the next Paralympics games or worst, regional elections to harvest attention. We must act now.

Indra Yohanes Kiling  is a LPDP scholarship awardee, member of GoLive Indonesia and also a Ph.D candidate in Psychology, at The University of Adelaide. His research focuses on finding best practices to support persons with disabilities in Indonesia.

Gracia Girsang is an Australia Awards awardee and a Ph.D Candidate at the Institute of International Trade, Faculty of the Professions, the University of Adelaide under the Australia Awards Scholarship. Gracia is also the project coordinator of GoLive Indonesia, a University of Adelaide-based project aiming at promoting discussion in various topics.

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Filed under Disability, Indonesia, Law, Research